International Journal of Infertility & Fetal Medicine

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VOLUME 8 , ISSUE 3 ( September-December, 2017 ) > List of Articles

REVIEW ARTICLE

Critical Analysis of the Current Assisted Reproductive Technology Guidelines

Manishi Mittal, P Jyothishmathi Sharma

Citation Information : Mittal M, Jyothishmathi Sharma P. Critical Analysis of the Current Assisted Reproductive Technology Guidelines. Int J Infertil Fetal Med 2017; 8 (3):113-119.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10016-1159

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 01-12-2017

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2017; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim

To present an overview of the current Artificial Reproductive Techniques (ART) guidelines focussing on grey zones

Introduction

Infertility is a major health and social concern in modern day India. Due to the great diversity in management protocols and absence of standard operating procedures, there is a necessity to develop country-specific guidelines for assisted reproduction. Also, there is need to curb unethical practices. Guidelines in this regard have undergone several changes over the years. It is important that adequate care is taken before the bill becomes a law so that both patients and health workers mutually benefit from ART

Overview

The present article gives an insight into the development of guidelines over the years with elaboration of the salient features of the current ART Bill under specific chapter headings, ten chapters in total. Also discussed is the recent Surrogacy Bill. In each context, critical analysis is provided that underscores the grey areas that need to be addressed. At the end of the article, certain recommendations have been put forward to aid the successful implementation of current guidelines

Clinical significance

It is imperative that all ART practitioners be well versed with the current ART guidelines as ignorance cannot be cited as an excuse under any circumstance. Also, practitioners can give valuable inputs before the bill finally becomes a law. The law must ensure that physicians are not unnecessarily persecuted in the name of patient rights, as this will lead to fearful practice, which in turn will hamper patient management.

How to cite this article

Sharma PJ, Mittal M. Critical Analysis of the Current Assisted Reproductive Technology Guidelines. Int J Infertil Fetal Med 2017;8(3):113-119.


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